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Colorado Court of Appeals Opinions
July 17, 2014

The Court of Appeals summaries are written for the Colorado Bar Association by licensed attorneys Teresa Wilkins (Denver) and Paul Sachs (Steamboat Springs). Please note that the summaries of Opinions of the Colorado Court of Appeals are provided as a service by the Colorado Bar Association and are not the official language of the Court. The Colorado Bar Association cannot guarantee the accuracy or completeness of the summaries.

2014 COA 90. No. 11CA2032. People v. Rios.
Second-Degree Murder—First-Degree Assault—Jury Instructions—Plea Agreement—Refusal to Testify—Use of Physical Force—Combat-by-Agreement—Self-Defense.

A fight between rival gangs resulted in the death of one person (victim) after Lakiesha Vigil, a member of defendant’s gang, drove her car into a crowd of people who had moved their fight to a driveway. She hit the 16-year-old victim, pinning his upper torso against the wall. Vigil then drove the car out of the driveway. It was unclear whether defendant and/or defendant’s cousin, Anthony Quintana, hit the victim with a bat a few times before getting into Vigil’s vehicle. The victim died at the hospital several hours after the incident. Defendant was convicted of second-degree murder and first-degree assault.

On appeal, defendant argued that the trial court erred in failing to instruct the jury not to consider Quintana’s refusal to testify as evidence of his guilt, and erred in informing the jury about Quintana’s plea agreement. Quintana had entered into a plea agreement whereby he agreed to testify against defendant. However, when called to testify against defendant, Quintana refused to testify. The trial court thereafter erred by instructing the jury regarding Quintana’s guilty plea, because it may have given rise to an impermissible inference of defendant’s guilt, which was not cured by any limiting language. Further, this error was not harmless beyond a reasonable doubt. The Court of Appeals reversed defendant’s convictions, and the case was remanded for a new trial.

Defendant also argued that the trial court erred in instructing the jury on the use of physical force as a self-defense. The trial court erred in instructing the jury on the provocation exception to self-defense, because the evidence did not warrant giving these instructions. Accordingly, on retrial, if the same or similar evidence is presented, the trial court should not instruct the jury on the provocation exception to self defense.

Finally, the court’s combat-by-agreement instructions failed to instruct the jury that the prosecution had the burden of proving beyond a reasonable doubt that mutual combat has been established. If this error arises on retrial, it also must be corrected.

2014 COA 91. No. 13CA1797. Castro v. Lintz.
Workers’ Compensation—Tort—Piercing the Corporate Veil—Enforcement of Judgment—Breach of Duty to Creditor—Dismissal—Attorney Fees—CRS § 13-17-201.

In 2010, Castro was employed by Lintz Construction, Inc. He was injured during the course of his employment when he fell from the roof of a building while shoveling snow. Castro filed a workers’ compensation claim against both Lintz Construction and Jonathan Lintz personally. The administrative law judge (ALJ) ordered Lintz Construction to pay Castro benefits in the amount of $4,536.76. The district court later granted Lintz’s motion to dismiss Castro’s claims to enforce the judgment against Lintz on the ground that the claims were barred by the doctrine of claim preclusion, awarding attorney fees to Lintz. 

On appeal, Castro contended that the district court erred as a matter of law in awarding Lintz attorney fees under CRS § 13-17-201. An award of attorney fees under § 13-17-201 is mandatory when a trial court dismisses a tort action under CRCP 12(b). Castro’s claims for disregarding the corporate form (piercing the corporate veil) to recover the money he had already been awarded in the workers’ compensation claim and enforcement of his judgment against Lintz Construction do not sound in tort. Although Castro’s breach of duty to creditor was a tort, the essence of this claim did not sound in tort because Castro sought to recover only the benefits he was awarded. Therefore, the district court erred in awarding Lintz his attorney fees under CRS § 13-17-201. The order was reversed.

Colorado Court of Appeals Opinions

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