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TCL > August 2002 Issue > In Memoriam

The Colorado Lawyer
August 2002
Vol. 31, No. 8 [Page  84]

© 2002 The Colorado Lawyer and Colorado Bar Association. All Rights Reserved.

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In Memoriam

In Memoriam

John J. Flynn, Jr. died on June 12, 2002. He was 79. Flynn had a mining engineering degree from Colorado School of Mines and a law degree from th University of Denver College of Law. He was a founding member of the Denver law firm of Inman Flynn &Biesterfeld, P.C., founded in 1961. Flynn served as outside general counsel for the Metro Wastewater Reclamation District from its inception in 1963 until his retirement on December 31, 1993. He was a thirty-six-year member of the Colorado Bar Association, joining in 1957, and was a member of the CBAEnvironmental Law Section. Flynn was an active member of the Denver Rotary Club. He is survived by two sons and two daughters. Contributions in Flynn’s memory may be made to the American Cancer Society, Porter Hospice, or Alzheimer’s Association.

 

Denver attorney Thomas Albert Gilliam died on June 14, 2002. He was 83. Gilliam was appointed Assistant City Attorney in 1954 and held that position for thirty-four years until his retirement in 1988. He served as advisor on such projects as the revitalization of Larimer Square in downtown Denver, as well as the creation of the Auraria campus. Gilliam was born in Denver in 1919 and grew up in the Capitol Hill neighborhood. He was awarded a scholarship to "the Ivy League school of his choice" after graduating from East High School in Denver. He selected Columbia University and graduated in 1941. He attended Yale Law School and received his law degree in 1948. Gilliam also received a Master’s degree from the University of Colorado–Boulder ("CU") in 1949, and served as a CU Regent from 1954 to 1960. Gilliam taught classes in family law and social conflict at the University of Denver. He was an Honor Life member of the CBA and Denver Bar Association, both of which he joined in 1968. Additionally, he wrote extensively and received several awards from the American Bar Association for his writings. Gilliam is survived by three children and one grandchild.

 

Attorney Richard Noel Graham died on February 17, 2002. He was 75. "Dick" Graham was Public Administrator for the Eighteenth Judicial District for more than twenty-five years. Graham graduated from the University of Denver College of Law in 1951. He became a member of the CBA in 1962, and was an Honor Life member. He was one of the founding members of the Arapahoe County Bar Association and served as its president. In 2000, Graham was honored by the ACBAwith the Charles Dillion Award for his professionalism and attention to his clients "beyond the call of duty." Graham’s life included noteworthy endeavors, including participation in numerous charities. He managed the first dude ranch in Colorado—the "Lost Valley Dude Ranch." He established the first jury wheel in Arapahoe County. He was a charter member of the Arapahoe County Sentinel Service for Mankind for more that forty years, holding all of its offices. He acted as president and district governor of the Sertoma Club; president of the Paradise Valley Country Club of Denver; the national director of the U.S. Cribbage Congress, which he founded; and a member of the Englewood City Council and the Arapahoe County Fair board. He was a Cribbage Master. Family, friends, and colleagues remember Graham as a "devoted husband" to his wife Roberta, a "caring father," and a "dedicated and hard worker" who was "totally committed to the legal profession."

 

Kenneth Norman Kripke, founder of the Colorado Trial Lawyers Association ("CTLA") died on June 19, 2002. He was 82. "Norm" Kripke was born in Toledo, Ohio, and attended Ohio State University. He served as Captain in the Army Air Corps during World War II. He attended the University of Colorado Law School and graduated in 1948. He was admitted to practice law in Colorado in 1949. Kripke founded the CTLA to "train fellow lawyers in the proper legal representation of injured consumers and to promote fellowship among lawyers." In addition to serving as CTLA president, he was president of the Western Trial Lawyers Association and president of the Trial Lawyers for Public Justice. Kripke chaired the CBA’s Litigation Section; served three terms on the board of the Association of Trial Lawyers of America; was treasurer of the Allied Jewish Federation of Denver; and acted as chairman of the Anti-Defamation League, serving four years as chair of itsCivil Rights Committee. He served on the Colorado Supreme Court Rules Committee for fifteen years. In 1996, the CTLA established the "Kenneth Norman Kripke Award for Lifetime Achievement," which is presented annually to the "deserving among plaintiff trial lawyers." Kripke is survived by Derril, his wife of fifty-six years, two daughters, three grandchildren, and several great-grandchildren. Contributions in Kripke’s memory may be made to: San Diego Hospice, 4311 3rd Ave., San Diego, CA 92103; or Trial Lawyers Care (a nonprofit group of lawyers offering free legal assistance to victims of September 11), c/o CTLA, 1888 Sherman St., Denver, CO 80203-1158.

 

 

Denver environmental law attorney Holly Holder died on June 9, 2002. She was 50. Holder was born in Albuquerque, New Mexico. She attended the University of Colorado–Boulder, where she was the first female "Evans/Eisenhower Scholar." She received her BAdegree in 1974 and her J.D. degree with honors in 1980. Holder joined the CBA in 1984, and was a member of the Real Estate Law and Water Law Sections, as well as the Legal Fee Arbitration Committee. She had attained CBAand DBA "Senior" membership status. Holder was an accomplished golfer and won numerous golf titles, including a Colorado state women’s championship. She was inducted into the Colorado Golf Hall of Fame. Holder is survived by one son. Contributions in Holder’s memory may be made to: Eric Holder Trust Fund, c/o Union Bank and Trust, Attn. Mike Giesen, 5501 S. Broadway, Littleton, CO 80121; (303) 744-3221.

 

Robert E. Jaros, a Denver attorney emphasizing corporate law and estate planning, died on June 5, 2002. He was 60. Jaros was born in Grand Junction, Colorado. He graduated from the University of Colorado–Boulder in 1964, with a degree in philosophy and history. He received a Master’s degree in Business from the University of Oregon in 1966 and graduated from the University of Denver College of Law in 1968. He became licensed to practice law in Colorado in 1969 and became a CBA member that year as well. Jaros was a member of the CBABusiness Law, Taxation Law, and Trust & Estate Law Sections. He was a volunteer of Metro Volunteer Lawyers, which coordinates no-fee and low-fee legal services to the indigent with assistance and participation of volunteer lawyers. Jaros is survived by Sandra, his wife of thirty-seven years, two children, and two grandchildren. Contributions in Jaros’s memory may be made to: VNA Hospice at Home, 390 Grant St., Denver, CO 80203; or National Brain Tumor Foundation, 414 13th St., Ste. 700, Oakland, CA 94612-2603.

 

Harold L. Meadoff, a Denver attorney, died in 2002. He was 79. Meadoff was licensed to practice law in Colorado in 1950 and joined the CBA in 1951. He was a World War II veteran. Meadoff was an Honor Life member of the CBA and DBA. He volunteered his services to Metro Volunteer Lawyers.

 

Solo practitioner Bruce G. McLellan died in 2002. He was 72. McLellan was admitted to practice law in Colorado and joined the CBA in 1961. He had attained "Senior" membership status in the First Judicial District Bar Association, as well as the CBA. His practice emphasized business, probate, and real estate law. McLellan was a Metro Volunteer Lawyers volunteer.

 

Arapahoe County attorney W. Richard McMartin died on February 1, 2002. He was 70. "Dick" McMartin was born in Omaha, Nebraska. He received his Bachelor’s degree from the University of Virginia and his law degree from the University of Nebraska. He was admitted to practice law in Colorado in 1958. McMartin had attained "Senior" membership status with the CBAand the Arapahoe County Bar Association, and served as ACBApresident in 1968–1969. He was a member of the CBA Family Law Section. McMartin was active in community affairs and served as president of the Englewood Rotary Club. McMartin is survived by his wife Sandy, three children, and seven grandchildren.

 

Ruth Rouss O’Rourke died in Colorado Springs on December 29, 2001. She was 87. O’Rourke was born in Des Moines, Iowa. She graduated from Drake University Law School in 1937. She moved to Colorado Springs in 1945 with her husband, Dennis O’Rourke, also a lawyer. She was admitted to practice law in Colorado in 1946. O’Rourke was a member of the CBA Mental Health, Legal Services for the Poor, and Family Law Committees. She was an Honor Life member of the CBA. O’Rourke was president of the board of trustees of the Joseph Henry Edmonson Foundation and an active member of the American Law Institute. She had been a member of the Colorado Springs Chorale, Penrose Hospital Medical Ethics Committee, Human Relations Commission of the City of Colorado Springs, and board of directors of the Colorado Opera Festival. O’Rourke is survived by six children, four grandchildren, and one great-grandchild. Contributions in O’Rourke’s memory may be made to: Haven House (which provides services to the mentally ill), 111 North Walnut, Colorado Springs, CO 80905.

 

Denver attorney Wilbur M. Pryor, Jr. died on June 21, 2002. He was 85. "Wib" Pryor was a World War II Navy veteran. Pryor graduated from the University of Colorado Law School in 1941. He was admitted to practice law in Colorado in 1941 and became a CBAmember in 1946. Pryor joined the Denver law firm of Ireland, Stapleton & Pascoe, P.C. in 1946; he became a partner in 1950. He acted as assistant state attorney general on a part-time basis between 1952 and 1956, and later represented Colorado in the first insurance company insolvency case since the Great Depression. Pryor was a member of the Business Law, Real Estate Law, and Trust & Estate Law Sections of the CBA, and was an Honor Life member of the DBA. Pryor considered himself a "social golfer," enjoying the camaraderie as much as the actual game. He also took great pleasure in traveling with Phyllis, his wife of sixty years. Pryor is survived by his wife, three children, and eight grandchildren.

 

Retired federal judge Harry Hadley Ruston died on June 14, 2002. He was 94. Ruston was born in Omaha, Nebraska. He was a journalist both in Nebraska and Denver. Ruston’s "adventure-seeking" reputation included a trip around the world by motorcycle while working as a journalist. Ruston graduated from the University of Denver College of Law in 1932. He taught aviation at his private airport in Federal Heights to pilots-in-training during World War II. The airport, "Ruston Field," was said to be the first private airport in Colorado. Ruston worked for the U.S. Department of Justice under President Truman, who appointed him to a federal judgeship. Ruston also taught at the University of Denver College of Law and wrote extensively on oil and gas issues. Ruston is survived by his wife Florence, two daughters, and six grandchildren.

 

 

Donald P. Smith, former Colorado Court of Appeals Judge, died on June 11, 2002. He was 70. Smith was born in Wyandotte, Michigan, and came to Colorado as an infant. He graduated from East High School in Denver and, after serving in the U.S. Army, attended Colorado State University in Fort Collins. He was married to Marjorie Gearhart in Denver in 1952. Smith then attended the University of Denver, where he earned an electrical engineering degree in 1954. He earned his law degree in 1956 from the University of Denver College of Law. He was admitted to practice law in Colorado in 1956 and joined the CBA that year as well. Smith had his own law firm in Englewood, and served as Sheridan’s City Attorney for a time. In 1964, Smith was elected to a state trial judgeship in the Eighteenth Judicial District. He was appointed to the Colorado Court of Appeals in 1972 and sat on that bench until 1993. After retiring from the Court of Appeals, he continued to assist with crowded dockets in the capacity of "Senior Judge." Judge Smith was a founding member of the Interfaith Task Force; Courthouse Inc., which provides court-ordered housing for juveniles; and the Marvin W. Foote Juvenile Detention Center. He was a 33rd-degree Mason and a Grand Master of the Masons in Colorado, as well as a Master of South Denver Lodge No. 93. He was a faculty member of the National College of State Trial Judges and served as chairman of the Denver Council of the Boy Scouts of America. Judge Smith attained "Senior" membership status with the CBA, DBA, and ACBA. He was a member of the CBACourt Reform and Professionalism Committees, and extended his expertise and services to Metro Volunteer Lawyers. Judge Smith is survived by two children—one of whom, Marcia Smith Krieger, is a U.S. District Court Judge appointed by President George W. Bush—and five grandchildren. Contributions in Judge Smith’s memory may be made to: Grand Lodge Preservation and Assistance Fund, c/o Masonic Grand Lodge of Colorado, 1130 Panorama Dr., Colorado Springs, CO 80904; or Little Chapel in the Hills Building Fund, Buffalo Creek, CO 80425.

 

 

Helen Thorp Street died on May 6, 2002. She was 89. Street was a part-time attorney specializing in trusts and estates, and was a member of the faculty of the University of Denver College of Law. She was born in Marion, Kansas, and moved to Denver with her widowed mother in 1921. Street graduated from Kent School for Girls in 1929. She received her undergraduate degree from Vassar College in 1932 and studied at the Sorbonne in Paris, France. In 1939, Street graduated from the University of Denver College of Law, and in 1940 earned the top score on the Colorado Bar exam. She became the first woman to teach at an accredited law school in the United States when she joined DU’s faculty in 1940. The Colorado Women’s Bar Association honored Street in 1991 with the "Mary Lathrop Trailblazer Award," named after a renowned female attorney who was admitted to practice law in Colorado in 1896. Smith married lawyer John Campbell Street in 1942; they had one child. Street was on the board of the Legal Aid Society of Denver, and was extremely active in other charities as well. She is survived by her daughter and two grandchildren. Contributions in Judge Smith’s memory may be made to: University of Denver College of Law, 7039 E. 18th Ave., Denver, CO 80202; or Denver Dumb Friends League, 2080 S. Quebec St., Denver, CO 80231.

 

 

The Colorado Bar Foundation ("Foundation") is one means of commemorating members of the profession. The Foundation was established in 1953 and functions exclusively for educational and charitable purposes. The Foundation promotes the advancement of jurisprudence and the administration of justice in Colorado through grants to help educate the general public and provide assistance to the state’s legal institutions. All gifts to the Foundation are deductible contributions for federal income tax purposes. For additional details about becoming a Foundation supporter, call Dana Collier Smith in Denver at (303) 824-5318 or (800) 332-6736.

© 2002 The Colorado Lawyer and Colorado Bar Association. All Rights Reserved. Material from The Colorado Lawyer provided via this World Wide Web server is protected by the copyright laws of the United States and may not be reproduced in any way or medium without permission. This material also is subject to the disclaimers at http://www.cobar.org/tcl/disclaimer.cfm?year=2002.


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