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TCL > October 2006 Issue > In Memoriam

The Colorado Lawyer
October 2006
Vol. 35, No. 10 [Page  110]

© 2006 The Colorado Lawyer and Colorado Bar Association. All Rights Reserved.

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Notices, Products, and Services

In Memoriam

The Colorado Bar Association Remembers the
Lives and Contributions of Colorado Attorneys.


James ("Jamie") M. Alexander IV

James ("Jamie") McKenzie Alexander IV died in September 2006. He was 52. Alexander earned his bachelor’s degree from Central Washington University and his J.D. degree from the University of Denver. He also had a master’s degree in Latin American studies from the University of Albuquerque and a master’s degree in anthropology from the University of Texas at Austin. Before attending law school, Alexander worked for Colorado Rural Legal Services and the Migrant Health Program of the Colorado Department of Health. He also worked as an interpreter and probation officer for the Denver County Court. After law school, Alexander practiced family law with Riggs, Abney, Neal, Turpen, Orbison and Lewis. He was a member of the CBA and DBA, and the Family Law Section. Alexander enjoyed hunting, fishing, and poetry; his poem entitled "Perfection" was awarded "Honorable Mention" in The Colorado Lawyer Poetry Contest (see 35 The Colorado Lawyer 44 (Sept. 2006)). Alexander is survived by his life partner Kay M. Nefzger, his parents, and two sons.

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Thomas Crumpacker

Thomas Crumpacker died on August 11, 2006. He was 72. He was raised in Colorado and practiced law in Denver, Aspen, and Carbondale. Crumpacker spent his retirement years in Miami, Florida, writing essays on relations between the United States and Cuba. He is survived by his wife Maray, two daughters, and three sisters. Donations in Crumpacker’s name may be made to The National Committee to Free the Cuban Five (http://www.freethefive.org) or Common Ground Community (http://www.commonground.org). A memorial in Crumpacker’s honor is planned for August 2007. Contact Casey at (512) 477-1015 or loulou@riseup.net for more information.

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Gordon Greiner

Gordon Greiner died on August 24. He was 71. He earned his undergraduate and J.D. degrees at Northwestern University. Greiner then came to Denver to work for Holland & Hart, where he spent his entire legal career as a trial attorney. He was one of eighteen Holland & Hart attorneys who represented several Denver families in their segregation lawsuit against the Denver Public Schools Board of Education. In 1973, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld a ruling finding deliberate segregation in the schools, and twenty-two years of busing followed. (See Keyes v. Denver School Dist. 1, 413 U.S. 189 (1973).) Greiner was known for being outspoken in his criticism of then-President Richard Nixon, an opponent of busing, and for wearing long hair and a long beard during his legal career. He was a member of the CBA and DBA since 1959. After his retirement, he and his wife Kathy relocated to Washington state. He is survived by his wife, a daughter, and a son.

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Joe S. Reynolds

Joe S. Reynolds died on May 17, 2006. He was 83. Reynolds received his undergraduate from the University of Colorado and his. J.D. degree from the University of Denver College of Law. After practicing law in Denver for ten years, Reynolds and his family relocated to Arizona in 1960. He practiced law in Mesa, Arizona, for forty years. Reynolds was a member of the Optimist Club and the Mesa Country Club, and was a member of the CBA and DBA since 1951. He is survived by his wife Virginia, two sons, two daughters, two grandchildren, and his dog Papi. Donations in Reynolds’s memory may be made to the Muhammad Ali Parkinson’s Foundation, c/o Barrow Neurological Foundation, 350 W. Thomas Road, Phoenix, AZ 85013 (http://www.stjosephs-phx.org/stellent/websites/get_page_cache.asp?nodeId=5001542).


The Colorado Bar Foundation ("CBF") was established in 1953 and is one means of commemorating members of the legal profession. The CBF functions exclusively for educational and charitable purposes, and promotes the advancement of jurisprudence and the administration of justice in Colorado through grants. Gifts to the CBF are tax-deductible. For complete information and to become a CBF supporter, contact Dana Collier Smith in Denver at (303) 824-5318, (800) 332-6736, or dcolliersmith@cobar.org.

Send "In Memoriam" information to: tracyr@cobar.org. Mail to: Tracy Rackauskas, The Colorado Lawyer, 1900 Grant St., Ste. 900, Denver, CO 80203. Call (303) 824-5326 with questions. Print or electronic photographs also may be sent. "In Memoriam" items are printed as production deadlines and space permit.

© 2006 The Colorado Lawyer and Colorado Bar Association. All Rights Reserved. Material from The Colorado Lawyer provided via this World Wide Web server is protected by the copyright laws of the United States and may not be reproduced in any way or medium without permission. This material also is subject to the disclaimers at http://www.cobar.org/tcl/disclaimer.cfm?year=2006.


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