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TCL > May 2014 Issue > The CBA’s Golden Book of Anecdotes and Wisdom—From Attorneys, For Attorneys

The Colorado Lawyer
May 2014
Vol. 43, No. 5 [Page  13]

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In and Around the Bar
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The CBA’s Golden Book of Anecdotes and Wisdom—From Attorneys, For Attorneys

CBA senior attorneys (65+ years) are sharing anecdotes, advice, and guidance related to the practice of law with their junior colleagues. This is well-earned knowledge that might benefit less-experienced attorneys and provide guidance for new attorneys as they transition from law school and begin their legal career.

Send your contribution(s) by e-mail to leonamartinez@cobar.org, using "Golden Book" in the subject line, or by U.S. mail to: Golden Book, c/o Leona Martínez, The Colorado Lawyer, 1900 Grant St., Ste. 900, Denver, CO 80203. The "Golden Book" collection of retrospections and advice is an ongoing effort, and submissions will continue to be printed in The Colorado Lawyer and posted online at www.cobar.org/index.cfm/ID/22110.


In the 1950s, when I was a student at the University of Colorado Law School, we had a professor named Fred Storke who taught Contracts and Conflicts of Law. Looking back, he had great wisdom. Although I am sure none of us realized the significance at the time, he gave us what turned out for me to be classical advice on advocacy. He said that in advocacy, there are two separate and distinct parts. Most lawyers think there is only one—the law and the facts. He said that much more important is to make the decision makers want to decide for you. If they want to decide for you, they will figure a way to make the law and the facts work. Over the years, I have observed many successes for those who followed that advice, and failures for those who did not.

Dick Bratton, Gunnison

. . .

Retired Senior Judge Herbert Galchinsky is being honored this May for having practiced fifty years. He is affectionately known as "Herbie, the Love Judge," because he performs many weddings during the year and especially on Valentine’s Day, when he officiates at dozens of weddings for free at the [Denver] Clerk and Recorder’s Office in the City and County Building, where they have a heart-shaped canopy for the wedding services.

He had previously worked for me as a process server when he was in law school. When he became a county court judge, I wanted to congratulate him. I was able to locate three cancelled checks that I had paid him for serving process. I had those mounted in a frame with the words:

Remember to be humble.
You can be returned to
the bottom of the legal system
where you started serving process.

He hung this on the wall of his chambers and has told me many times that every day he came into the chambers, he looked at it to remind himself of the need to be a decent human being as he sat on the bench and carried out his judicial duties.

Jacques A. Machol, Jr., Denver

 

© 2014 The Colorado Lawyer and Colorado Bar Association. All Rights Reserved. Material from The Colorado Lawyer provided via this World Wide Web server is protected by the copyright laws of the United States and may not be reproduced in any way or medium without permission. This material also is subject to the disclaimers at http://www.cobar.org/tcl/disclaimer.cfm?year=2014.


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